Program

2nd World Health Care & Nursing Conference | September 19 - 21, 2022 | Online

Vahid Salehi

Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada

Abstract:

Task analysis is a descriptive method that has been widely applied in healthcare systems. It is especially used to assess and define work conditions that define the scope of practice of a health profession or occupation. This research employs functional resonance analysis method (FRAM), which is a function-based systemic approach and is used to identify constituent activities/tasks of socio-technical operations and connect them. It is useful in describing functions/tasks based on six aspects, including input, output, preconditions, resources, time, and control. Unlike conventional task analysis techniques, the FRAM is a non-sequential non-hierarchical task analysis approach. Instead, it is a goals-means technique meaning that activities/tasks need certain means to achieve goals. To demonstrate the suitability of the FRAM in task analysis, nursing work is described and analyzed in community-based health and social care services. A semi-structured interview approach is used for data collection. A network of activities regarding nursing work is represented. It expected to identify inputs and resources required for producing acceptable outcomes for each activity and the entire process of nursing work. The systemic task analysis technique also helps find controls required to monitor each activity to prevent poor outcomes.

Audience Take Away: 

  • A systemic approach to task analysis is introduced.
  • A descriptive model of nursing work is represented. 
  • Healthcare providers can use the systemic approach introduced by this research for other purposes in other healthcare operations. 
  • The systemic approach helps identify inputs and resources required for producing acceptable outcomes for each activity and the entire process of nursing work.
  • It also helps find controls required to monitor each activity to prevent poor outcomes.

Biography:

Vahid Salehi is a Ph.D. at Memorial University of Newfoundland. His research interests are centered around understanding, modelling, and improving operations in socio-technical systems using a wide range of analytical techniques and systemic approaches such as functional resonance analysis method (FRAM) and multi-criteria decision-making (MCDM). He is interested and has experience in modelling and testing systems that improve human-systems performance in socio-technical domains such as healthcare. He has published 32 papers in reputable academic journals and conferences.